So Much Things About Food supplements You Should Know

Ideally, a healthy and varied diet would provide your body with all the nutrients it needs. In some cases, however, food is grown in depleted soils or artificially under lights in hothouses. For example, selenium content in soils is varied and regional. New Zealand soils are quite low in selenium, as are parts of Australia, South Africa and North America, but it is important as an antioxidant and in supporting Vitamin E in your body. Antioxidants are certain minerals and vitamins, which are found in food sources. There are now many substances available from both natural and synthetic sources. Many (and certainly not all) of them can mimic the properties of natural antioxidants. A good rule of thumb is to see if the ingredients included in an antioxidant supplement are part of the natural human diet. If they are not, for example, if they come from tree bark, then do you thin) it would be appropriate to add them to the human food chain? Some studies suggest not. But, remember, one dose of antioxidants will not give you a healthy, youthful body fore\ They must be continually replaced in your diet to keep pace with free radical production. a diet laden with fresh, unprocessed wholefoods is essential.

Vitamin and Mineral Supplements

Many people today take vitamin products. There is no doubt that many offer nutritior insurance. However, studies have shown that some supplements are poorly digested and ix through the body without much benefit. We have both taken supplements over the years f all sorts of reasons. Often we relied on health professionals or pharmacy assistants to advi us as to which supplements we should take and how often. We placed our health in the han of people we didn’t even know and who may have had little idea what our bodies neede By educating yourself and continuing to learn about supplements you will, over time, mal more sophisticated decisions about which ones to take and how to optimise your diet wil quality supplements. The responsibility lies in your hands.

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Shopping for super foods

You may not realise it but you have been eating phytochemicals all your life. Phytonutrients, as they are sometimes referred to, give fruit, vegetables, grains and legumes their flavour colour and protection against disease. They help form the plants’ immune system and potent antioxidants, such as Vitamin C, carotenoids (fat-soluble pigments like beta-carotei and lycopene) and flavonoids (water-soluble pigments like catechins and reserveratro Studies are now showing that they have a protective effect against many ailments such high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and cancer. So, once again the key message is t make sure you eat your fruit and veges daily!

Whole grains and bread

Whole grains add essential vitamins and fibre to your diet. Try some different grains you might not have had before, such as millet, quinoa, buckwheat or barley, available at health- food shops and some supermarkets. Brown rice also belongs in this category: it is far superior to white rice and you will quickly acquire a taste for this yummy, nutty food. There is a huge variety of bread out there. We recommend going for bread in which you can see the whole grains. Check the labels, as some bread is high in sodium or fat, although it may look healthy.

Nuts and seeds

Nuts and seeds are other great snacks loaded with nutrients, essential fats and protein. Add them into your cooking and sprinkle them over your vegetable dishes, breakfasts or yoghurt. Take good care to buy them fresh, as rancid nuts can be quite toxic. It is best to buy them from bulk bins where you can ‘sniff’ for rancidity.

Cholesterol Free, it is NOT Fat Free

It is worth mentioning cholesterol here, while we are talking about fats. Often people think that if something is cholesterol free, it is fat free, but this is not the case. Cholesterol is a complex fatty substance that your body manufactures on a daily basis. It is used to manufacture cell membranes and provide a base for the synthesis of hormones (sex and adrenal), Vitamin D and bile acids. Your body produces about three-quarters of the cholesterol it has in the blood on its own in the liver; the rest comes from your food. Cholesterol from your food does not instantly become cholesterol in your blood. When you eat food high in cholesterol, such as egg yolks, liver, kidneys and shellfish, your body makes less from its own resources or gets rid of more.Studies have also shown that certain foods have a very positive effect in lowering the LDL levels in your blood, and provide essential nutrients to protect your heart. These are fruits and vegetables, plant sterols (found in cold-pressed oils, nuts, legumes, whole grains and fruits and vegetables), garlic, fish and seafood, tea (green and black), soy products, oats, psyllium and small amounts of red wine.